11581 Township Rd 516, Shreve, OH 44676, USA

©2017 by Tate Farms. Proudly created with Wix.com

PROUDLY SHARING OUR WAY OF LIFE

On our farm, we pride ourselves in what we do. This is not only what we do, but a way of life. To share our love of agriculture. We love our work and what we do. And not only to share what we do, but all of agriculture and be a contributing advocate for what we love

 

AG FACTS

Questions? We'll do our best to answer!

We want to educate the consumers and those who do not have an agricultural background. With some common questions arrising in our indutry and others as well, this will hopefully provide some understanding

WHAT IS A GMO?

A GMO, (genetically modified organism) is any organism(i.e plants, animals) with a genetic code that has been changed and altered using genetic engineering techniques. A variety of plant genetics with desirable characteristics have been inserted in many crops we know today

WHY ARE GMO'S IMPORTANT TO THE WORLD POPULATION?

The population is forever growing, which means we will be needing more food to sustain the population. Also we are loosing more and more farmland, therefore needing to reach the highest potential out of what we have to use is important. By increasing the genetic capability with plants we are able to get a larger yield to better provide the needed quantity and have safe product for the consumer.

WHAT IS THE FARM BILL?

The Farm Bill, otherwise know as the Agriculture Adjustment Act (AAA) was created in 1933 in the  midst of the great depression. It controls titles over aspects of agriculture and food.

DO FARMERS OVER APPLY  CHEMICALS?

Today's technology does not allow for over application. GPS allows for accurate mapping of the field and efficiency, preventing from over applying. New tools that allow farmers to document and follow application rules and regulations are becoming readily available. Much of this technology are being mobile enabled!

ARE GMO'S SAFE?

GMO's have underwent many tests, scientific results lead to GMO's being perfectly safe to consume. The Seralini experiment was conducted and believed to cause cancer to lab rats. The experiment was then retracted as the lab rats were diagnosed with cancer regardless of what they consumed. A crop such as corn is already a genetically altered crop regardless of what is performed on it now. Maize, the original version of corn, was the first cereal grains indigenous people used 10,000 years ago. Now we have the genetically altered corn.

IS MILK REALLY ANTIBIOTIC FREE?

All milk is antibiotic free! processors cannot except milk that has antibiotics in it. Labels on milk products are used to help their marketing and identification. All milk is free of any antibiotics

 

BY 2050 THERE WILL BE 10 BILLION PEOPLE TO FEED!

In recent studies, the predicted amount of people in the world will be 10 Billion in 2050. Farmers will be challenged with the need to feed all these people!

CONSERVATION IMPORTANCE!

Farmers, including us, are constantly doing things to preserve our soils. That is why farmers plant cover crops, a crop that is planted before winter and harvested in the spring, is planted. To have things growing helps hold the dirt and prevent erosion of the soil. Farmers plant grass water ways to ensure erosion minimization. Farmers are always working towards taking better care of the ground!

FEEDBACK!!

We are looking for information that you think needs to be included and answered. Let us know!

 

OUR TECHNOLOGY

What We Use

 

We utilize technology to maximize our productivity and monitor our progress.
· Use yield monitors to collect and analyze crop data.
· Track all of our field operations with GPS based records.
· Equip our machines with automatic steering systems that guide them through the field with +/-2 inch accuracy. This allows us to reduce overlap in field operations and control traffic patterns in fields.

THANK YOU FARM FLAVOR AND CAMP SILOS FOR THE INFORMATION!

SOYBEANS

• The livestock industry is the largest consumer of soy meal.


• The soybean is the highest natural source of dietary fiber.


• Soy ink is used to print textbooks and newspapers.


• In 2010, soybeans represented 56 percent of world oilseed production, and 33 percent of those soybeans were produced by the American farmer.


• The U.S. exported 1.16 billion bushels (31.6 million metric tons) of soybeans in 2008, which accounted for 40 percent of the world’s soybean trade.


• A 60-pound bushel of soybeans yields about 48 pounds of protein-rich meal and 11 pounds of oil.


• One and a half gallons of biodiesel and 48 pounds of soybean meal can be produced from one bushel of soybeans.

CORN

  • An ear of corn averages 800 kernels in 16 rows. 

  • A pound of corn consists of approximately 1,300 kernels.

  • 100 bushels of corn produces approximately 7,280,000 kernels. 

  • Each year, a single U.S. farmer provides food and fiber for 129 people - 97 in the U.S. and 32 overseas. 

  • In the U.S., corn production measures more than 2 times that of any other crop. 

  • Your bacon and egg breakfast, glass of milk at lunch, or hamburger for supper were all produced with U.S. corn. 

  • Corn is a major component in many food items like cereals, peanut butter, snack foods and soft drinks. 

  • U.S. researchers have led the way in finding many uses for corn - like in vitamins and amino acids.

  • Corn is used to produce fuel alcohol. Fuel alcohol makes gasoline burn cleaner, reducing air pollution, and it doesn't pollute the water.

BEEF CATTLE

  • Every day, 76 million Americans eat beef.


  • Beef is meat from full-grown cattle about 2 years old.


  • A live steer weighs about 1,000 pounds and yields about 450 pounds of edible meat.


  • More beef is consumed on Memorial Day than any other day of the year. The Fourth of July and Labor Day typically tie for second place.


  • Beef is one of the most important dietary sources of iron. To obtain the same amount of iron found in a 3-ounce serving of beef, you’d have to eat at least 3 cups of raw spinach.


  • There are more than 800,000 ranchers and cattle producers in the United States.                   

  • More than 97 percent of beef cattle farms and ranches are classified as family farms.